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NIB News: June 2012

CONTENTS:



FREE Subscriptions to Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics for Forum Bloggers!

We are looking for four people to commit to blogging at least once per month for our online Forum. Forum bloggers will receive a free one-year subscription to the journal. Each year we will look for new bloggers so the content will keep a fresh perspective. For those interested in this opportunity please contact Susan at narrativebioethics@gmail.com.

The Forum will serve several purposes:

  • The Forum provides a space to discuss particularly intriguing stories, narrative symposia, and articles and will host letters to the editors. From time-to-time, we will invite individuals to publish additional commentaries or book reviews.
  • The Forum will also publish stories that do not fit in a narrative symposium, but complement the symposium. For example, our latest issue on experiences of living organ donation will include stories from donors themselves. The Forum could host stories from transplant surgeons, organ recipients or others.
  • Finally, the Forum will be a great place to share our current calls for stories. Stories are the backbone of the journal, Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics, and we are always looking to expand our circle of authors.

The forum already has a few great pieces and we invite anyone with an interest in any topic related to NIB to send a short piece for consideration on our Forum.




Narrative Symposium on Living Organ Donors’ Experiences

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics Volume 2 Issue 1

The symposium focuses on the experiences of living organ donors. Eighteen individuals shared stories about what was positive, negative, rewarding, concerning, helpful, or difficult about their donation experience. Stories address the experiences of kidney and liver, living related and unrelated, directed and undirected, and paired donations.

The symposium was edited by Elisa Gordon and is followed by commentary articles by Paul Root Wolpe, a well published bioethicist, and Dianne LaPointe Rudow, who has been involved in the care of and advocacy for living organ donors.

This issue also contains our first Narrative Education Report. This study demonstrates that even one-time reflective writing workshops might create important opportunities for physicians to evaluate their experiences with dying patients and their families.

The Qualitative Research Article focuses on a rural immersion program for fourth-year medical students and primary care residents and the impact this experience had on participants, particularly their willingness to consider practicing medicine in underserved rural areas.

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics is available on Project MUSE

If you do not have access to Project MUSE please consider asking your librarian to order Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics. A request form is available here.




Calls for Stories

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics currently seeks stories for several upcoming narrative symposia. Click on the links to read a full description of the call. Please forward these calls to your friends! We have found many potential authors need a personal invitation before they feel comfortable sharing their stories. The quality of our narrative symposia depends entirely on our ability to recruit great stories from people who are open to sharing their experiences.

Parenting Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders During the Transition to Adulthood,” edited by Kelly Dineen, JD and Margaret Bultas, PhD. We still need a few more stories from parents but we only have one from a father’s perspective and would love to hear from more fathers.

Patient and Research Participant Experiences with Genome-Scale Testing,” edited by Laura M. Beskow, MPH, PhD and Wylie Burke, MD, PhD. We are still need most of the stories for this symposium!

We are currently working on calls for other issues so please watch our JHUP site for new calls.




Watch for our next issue in Fall 2012!
"Developing Health Care in Severely Resource-Constrained Settings,” edited by Paul Farmer and Sadath Sayeed.



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